Giant Crinkled Chocolate Chip Cookies

Giant Crinkle Choc Chip

When I was in junior high school the cafeteria use to serve these delicious, barely baked, warm chocolate chip cookies. They were SO amazing and I’ve spent years trying to find a recipe that replicated that cookie but to no avail. Then I made this recipe! Out of the oven, they reminded me so much of those giant, warm cookies from school. Score!!

This recipe comes from The New York Times , you can find the original recipe right hereTo ensure that these cookies came out EXACTLY like the ones pictured I weighed all of my ingredients instead of just measuring them out. With baking, being as precise as possible is the key to perfect, consistent results. That being said, if you don’t have a scale in your kitchen that is fine, just use measuring cups and spoons. Make sure you follow the directions very carefully, it’s imperative that you freeze your dough for the right amount of time and then watch those babies like a hawk once they are in the oven so that you can bang the pan at just the right time. DO NOT SKIP THIS STEP! Banging the pan not only allows the cookies to bake more evenly but it creates crispy edges, a gooey center, and those cool looking crinkle rings on the surface. Don’t be afraid to give them a good whack, you need the center to fall in on itself.

The recipe calls for 6 oz. of bittersweet chocolate, I decided to use Ghiradelli® brand. I was short 2 oz. though so I make up the difference with a Ghiradelli® Intense Dark Sea Salt Soiree bar. It’s a nice dark chocolate so it worked well as a replacement and it also added a hint of salt to the cookie which I really love. Do NOT use chocolate chips in this recipe, you will NOT get the same result both in appearance and flavor. Buy full bars of chocolate (you can find them in the baking or candy aisle) and roughly chop them with a chefs knife. The variation of chunks, shards, and bits really adds to the cookie. Lastly, in place of the pure vanilla extract I used vanilla paste and I increased the measurement to 2 teaspoons. I just love vanilla so for me, the more the better!

Trust me, these cookies are a keeper! They were out of this world and HUUUUUGE!!! You can definitely make them smaller but be sure to adjust the baking time if you do. Watch them carefully so they do not over bake. Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (256 grams) all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ½ pound (227 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 ½ cups (302 grams) granulated sugar
  • ¼ cup (55 grams) packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 ½ teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 6 ounces (170 grams) bittersweet chocolate (about 60 percent cacao solids), chopped into coarse pieces, bits and shards

Instructions

Adjust an oven rack to the middle position. Heat the oven to 350ºF. Line 3 baking sheets with aluminum foil, parchment paper or nonstick baking mats.In a small bowl, whisk the flour, baking soda and salt. Set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle, beat the butter on medium until creamy. Add the granulated and brown sugars and beat on medium until light and fluffy, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the egg, vanilla and 2 tablespoons water, and mix on low to combine. Add the flour mixture, and mix on low until combined. Add the chocolate and mix on low into the batter. (At this point, the dough can be refrigerated for several hours or overnight)

Form the dough into 3 1/2-ounce (100-gram) balls (a heaping 1/3 cup each). Place 4 balls an equal distance apart on a prepared pan, and transfer to the freezer for 15 minutes before baking. After you put the first baking sheet in the oven, put the second one in the freezer.

Place the chilled baking sheet in the oven and bake 10 minutes, until the cookies are puffed slightly in the center. Lift the baking sheet and let it drop down against the oven rack, so the edges of the cookies set and the inside falls back down. Bang it down, if necessary, to make the center fall.

After the cookies puff up again, 2 to 3 minutes later, repeat lifting and dropping the pan. Repeat a few more times, every 3 minutes, to create ridges around the edge of the cookie. Bake 16 to 18 minutes total, until the cookies have spread out, and the edges are golden brown, but the centers are much lighter and not fully cooked.

Transfer the baking sheet to a wire rack and let cool before removing the cookies from the pan.

Repeat with remaining cookies.

 

Bacon and Stout Beef Chili

Bacon Stout Chili

Although the cool, crisp days of fall have yet to arrive in New York (summer just won’t let go!) I was in the mood for a hearty, warm bowl of chili. Instead of a typical chili made with ground meat I decided to try out a cut up chuck roast instead. I was pleasantly surprised at just how tender and delicious this very tough piece of meat turned out. The key is to cook it low and slow, don’t try to rush this dish or you will be left with very chewy, tough, inedible meat. I promise, your patience will be rewarded.

The recipe is from the October 2017 issue of Food Network Magazine . (page 73) The original recipe is for Beef and Bean Chili but they offered a variation that included stout and bacon. Let’s face it, everything is better with bacon so I couldn’t pass that recipe up! I used Guinness Drought Stout but feel free to use your favorite brand stout for this chili.

This chili goes great with sturdy corn tortilla chips, cornbread, or even a nice slab of hot, buttered beer bread. Top with cheese, sour cream, bacon, scallions, or anything else that you like. Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 2 tbs vegetable oil
  • 2 lbs chuck roast, cut into 3/4″ cubes
  • Kosher salt and pepper, to taste
  • 3-4 slices thick cut bacon, chopped
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped (remove seeds for less heat)
  • 3 tbs chili powder, plus more to taste
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tbs tomato paste
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) diced tomatoes
  • 3 cups beef stock (I like Kitchen Basics brand)
  • 2 (15 oz) cans small red beans
  • 1 (12 oz) bottle stout beer

Instructions

Cook the bacon in a large pot until slightly crisp. Remove and set aside for topping.

Over medium-high heat, add the beef to the bacon fat and cook until browned, about 2-3 minutes. Do not overcrowd the pan, work in batches. Remove the meat with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Reduce the heat to medium and add the vegetable oil to the pot. Add the onion and cook until softened and browned, about 5 minutes. Stir occasionally as it cooks. Add the garlic and jalapeno and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 2 minutes.

Add the chili powder, cumin, salt, pepper, and tomato paste. While stirring, cook until deep red, about 2 minutes.

Add the beef and all of its juices back into the pot along with the beef stock, tomatoes, and stout beer. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat until the chili is simmering. Cook until the meat is fork tender, about 1.5 hours. Occasionally stir and scrape the bottom of the pot as it cooks.

Add the beans with some of their liquid and continue to simmer until the chili thickens, about 25-30 minutes. Season with additional salt, pepper, and chili as needed. Serve hot topped with grated cheddar cheese and the crisped bacon pieces from earlier.

**Tip** – If the chili isn’t thickening up enough, bring the chili to a boil and then add some masa flour to the pot or a mixture of water and all-purpose flour. Allow the chili to simmer until it thickens up. If the chili is too thick, add a little more stock as needed to thin it out.

 

“How-To” Baking – Fruit Desserts

Crumbles, crisps, and buckles………Oh my!! There are so many different ways to bake fresh fruit into a delectable dessert that it can be confusing and overwhelming. So let’s break it down one dessert at a time!

Crumble – A crumble is a baked dessert consisting of fresh fruit that is topped with an oat based streusel.

Crisp – A crisp is very similar to a crumble except the streusel topping is made from flour, not oats.

Brown Betty – A brown betty is very similar to a crisp. In fact, some recipes call for only fresh fruit with a streusel topping just like in a crisp. However, a layer of streusel can also be layered on the bottom as well. Other recipes call for the fruit to be layered between stale, buttered cubes of bread.

Cobbler – A cobbler is topped with individual dropped biscuits that create the look of a cobblestone street, hence the name “cobbler“.

Buckle – A buckle has a cake like batter underneath the fruit and is topped with crumbs. As it bakes the cake rises up while the fruit and crumbs weigh it down which causes a buckling effect. The most common type of buckle is blueberry but it can be made with other types of fruit.

Grunt/Slump – A grunt or a slump is similar to a cobbler however, instead of being baked in the oven it is cooked in a covered pan on a stovetop or over a campfire. The biscuits are steamed rather than baked like in a cobbler.

The term “grunt” was coined because of the noise that the hot, bubbly fruit makes as it cooks. The term “slump” was coined because when the dessert is placed on a serving dish it doesn’t hold its form and it “slumps” on the dish.

Clafouti – A clafouti is topped with either cake or pudding.

Pandowdy – A pandowdy is a deep dish fruit dessert that is topped with brittle biscuits. As the pandowdy bakes, the biscuit topping is broken up and pounded into the fruit so that the juices from the fruit can rise up to the top.

Crostata/Galette – A crostata or galette is made with a rolled out piece of dough that’s piled with fruit. The edges of the dough are folded in to create a crust and then it gets an egg wash and a dusting of coarse sugar on top. This dessert is freeform in shape and it’s baked on a flat sheet.

These two desserts are identical except in name. A crostata is an Italian term and a galette is French but they can be used interchangeably as they are both referring to the same thing.

 

Apple Brown Betty

apple betty3

Apple pie is the quintessential fall dessert. It evokes memories of jumping in the leaves, cuddling up in a cozy sweater, and stuffing your face at Thanksgiving dinner. Making a delicious homemade apple pie isn’t all that difficult but it can be a little time consuming Instead, when a craving for apple pie hits try making an Apple Brown Betty! It has all of the same delicious flavor as an apple pie minus the hassle.

An Apple Brown Betty is very similar to a crumble or crisp. It’s a traditional American dessert made from apples that are topped with delicious sweetened crumbs. It is unclear of the exact origin of this dessert however, it was first mentioned in a cookbook dating all the way back to 1864! Just like its apple pie counterpart, it pairs really well with a nice, cold scoop of vanilla ice cream or freshly whipped cream.

The recipe that I used came from one of my most favorite cookbooks, The New England Orchard Cookbook: Harvesting Dishes & Desserts from the Region’s Bounty . If you love farm fresh fruit such as apples, berries, and peaches this would be a fabulous addition to your cookbook library. It features information on local farms all around the New England region (CT, MA, RI, VT, and NH) as well as a bounty of wonderful and delicious recipes like Streusel Spiced Cider Muffins, Orchard Cake, Apple Stuffing and more!

For this recipe I made a few, very slight changes. In place of the maple syrup that was called for I used pure apple syrup, I prefer the flavor over maple. The instructions said to use cinnamon, allspice, and nutmeg to taste but I instead tossed the apples with a cinnamon sugar blend and apple pie spice which is a mix of all the flavors that are called for. I also substituted Granny Smith apples for McIntosh. In general you can substitute one baking apple for another in most apple recipes. The top apples for baking are: Granny Smith, Jonagold, Braeburn, Cortland, and Honeycrisp.  

Ingredients

  • 8 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, and cut into chunks
  • 1/4 maple syrup
  • Cinnamon, allspice, and nutmeg, to taste
  • 1 full sleeve of graham crackers
  • 1 stick (1/4 lb) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • Vanilla ice cream or freshly whipped cream (optional)

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. In a large bowl, combine the apples with the syrup and spices. Toss to coat. Place in a medium casserole dish and set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the graham crackers, melted butter, and brown sugar. Using your hands, crumble up the crackers and mix everything together.

Pat the crumb mixture all over the top of the apples. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until the apples up bubbling up through the topping and the crust is golden brown.

Serve warm with vanilla ice cream or freshly whipped cream.

**Tip** – You can also use a food processor to turn the graham crackers into crumbs.

apple betty2

 

Chicken Caprese

Chicken Caprese

One of life’s greatest pleasures is biting into a caprese salad. Sweet, vine ripened tomatoes bursting with flavor are layered with creamy mozzarella, sweet basil and then generously sprinkled with Kosher salt and pepper. The final touch is a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and a flavorful balsamic. It’s truly a perfect, yet simple, dish. All of these lovely flavors also pair well with chicken so it was only logical to turn this beloved salad into a heartier dish of Chicken Caprese.

Simplicity is key with this meal. You will want to keep the flavors clean and bright so that the caprese salad shines and isn’t overpowered by a piece of chicken that is too bold and over seasoned. A basic salt and pepper rub with a drizzle of balsamic is all the chicken needs to be perfect. The fresh mozzarella, tomato, and basil will pack the flavor punch once it all comes together. I served this dish alongside Garlic Parmesan Pasta   which was a perfect accompaniment to this meal.

To intensify the flavor in this dish, opt for a balsamic reduction* in place of just straight vinegar. Drizzling vinegar straight from the bottle is more than fine however, reducing it down first will create a richer and more flavorful profile. It will also thicken considerably making it more likely to cling to the chicken. Take care when choosing your vinegar, there are many cheap options out there but for the best flavor, it’s worth investing a few extra dollars for a quality vinegar. I get all of my vinegar (and oil) at The Amazing Olive  in Port Jefferson, NY. They have an exceptional collection of oil and vinegar in so many unique and delicious flavors. If you’re not local, no worries, you can order right online! For this recipe I used their Traditional Balsamic which is excellent.

*To reduce vinegar – On the stovetop bring the vinegar to a simmer over medium-high heat then turn the heat down to low to keep it simmering. It will take about 15 minutes for the vinegar to reduce down, watch it carefully towards the end so it does not burn. You will know the vinegar is ready when it becomes thick and can coat the back of a spoon.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lbs boneless skinless chicken breast, halved and then halved horizontally 
  • 3-4 tbs extra-virgin olive oil, plus more as needed for browning
  • Kosher salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 tbs balsamic vinegar, plus more for drizzling
  • 2 large ripe tomatoes, sliced very thin and sprinkled with Kosher salt and pepper
  • 1 lb fresh mozzarella, sliced thin
  • handful of fresh basil, cut into ribbons

Instructions

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Rub the chicken with salt, pepper, and minced garlic until coated. Drizzle the balsamic over the chicken and lightly rub it in.

Place olive oil in a skillet set over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmering add the chicken. Cook until lightly browned on each side, about 3-4 minutes per side. Be sure not to overcrowd the pan, work in batches until all of the chicken has been browned. Place the chicken in a 9X13 baking dish coated lightly with cooking spray and drizzle with the remaining pan juices. Drizzle additional balsamic to taste.

Bake for about 25-30 minutes or until the juices run clear and the chicken is cooked through. In the last 5 minutes of cooking, remove the chicken from the oven and place 1-2 slices of tomato on each piece of chicken followed by 1-2 slices of fresh mozzarella. Lightly sprinkle the tops with Kosher salt and pepper. Return the pan to the oven and finish off the chicken. To melt and brown the cheese a little more, place the pan under the broiler for 2-4 minutes, watch closely so that the cheese doesn’t burn.

Remove from the oven. Using a spoon, drizzle each piece of chicken with the pan juices. Garnish with the basil ribbons. Serve hot.

Chicken Caprese2

One Pot Garlic Parmesan Pasta

garlic pasta

This is a fantastic pasta to serve as a side dish or even as a main meal. The nice part is that it’s made in one pot and basically cooks itself. It doesn’t get much easier than that! To serve this as a main meal, simply add in some grilled chicken and steamed broccoli and you have a nice, quick dinner. To save even more time, use a rotisserie chicken instead of grilling your own.

I came across this recipe online at Damn Delicious blog, you can find the original recipe right here . I followed the recipe pretty much “as is” with only a few minor substitutions. Instead of chicken broth I used chicken stock which is more flavorful and rich and I used Pecorino Romano cheese in place of the Parmesan. Since it was the only side dish that I was serving alongside my Chicken Caprese , I doubled the recipe.

This pasta is best when it is served right away so that the sauce is silky and smooth. Once it stands, it tends to clump. If that happens, just return the pasta to the pot over medium low heat and stir in a little extra milk until the sauce loosens back up. Serve hot and enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 tbs extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 cups chicken stock (I like Kitchen Basics brand)
  • 1 cup milk, more as needed
  • 2 tbs unsalted butter
  • 8 oz uncooked fettuccine or thin linguine
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese or Pecorino Romano
  • 2 tbs chopped fresh parsley leaves

Instructions

Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes.

Stir in chicken broth, milk, butter and fettuccine. Season with salt and pepper.

Bring to a boil then reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until pasta is cooked through, about 18-20 minutes. Stir in Parmesan cheese. If the mixture is too thick, add more milk as needed until desired consistency is reached.

Serve immediately, garnish with fresh parsley.

Kitchen Must Have – Deep Dish Pie Plate

Happiness is Homemade Pie

I readily admit that I have a slight obsession with all things kitchen related, particularly serving pieces such as bowls, platters and dishes. Recently, I came across a really nice deep dish pie plate at Sur La Table that I just couldn’t pass up, even though I already have one.  It was a beautiful color and on clearance for only $10 so I scooped it up! It’s been a very useful addition to my kitchen because it serves so many functions aside from holding pie. Here are just a few ways that I put my deep dish pie plates to work:

  • Serve chips at a party
  • Use it for a crudité plate – place a small bowl in the center for dip and surround with fresh veggies
  • Cook up a shepard’s pie
  • Serve homemade candies such as cut-up pieces of fudge
  • Bake a basic round cake
  • Whip up some creamy macaroni and cheese
  • Use it as a bread basket for sliced Italian bread or burger and hot dog buns
  • Stack homemade cookies inside
  • Use it for your next family breakfast, it’s perfect for holding a ton of scrambled eggs
  • Make a casserole for dinner
  • Serve pasta for two
  • Flip it over, place a plate on top, and you have a makeshift cake stand
  • Use it as a serving dish for mashed potatoes, rice, or other side dishes
  • Bake a batch of cinnamon buns
  • Use it to serve up hot, layered dips
  • Make a hearty quiche
  • Cook a family style chicken pot pie
  • Use it as a serving dish for fresh fruit salad
  • Fill it with mini muffins and pastries at your next brunch

In short, the best pieces for your kitchen are the ones that can perform double and triple duty so get the most out of the kitchen things that you own by figuring out how you can use them in another way. It’s so nice to be able to use all of the pretty things that you own instead of watching them accumulate dust. 

Lastly, and of course obviously, a deep dish pie plate makes an awesome, kick butt, sky high fruit pie. Shallow pie plates are great for things like pudding pies, custard pies, or pumpkin pies but for a fruit pie, deep dish is the way to go in my opinion. I love that you can pile in loads and loads of fruit without having to worry about it spilling over and creating a mess in your oven. Plus, what is better than a big, thick slice of pie smothered in vanilla ice cream or freshly whipped cream? My most favorite pie is Dutch Apple , it is filled with a ton of cinnamon sugar coated apples and finished with big, buttery crumbs on top. It’s definitely a crowd pleaser!

So go ahead and pull out those pie dishes and get creative. If you don’t have one, get one! You can find great deals on pie dishes at places like Home Goods, Target, Amazon, and especially clearance racks. A good rule of thumb is to have both a shallow and deep dish pie pan on hand, having both will allow you to create an endless amount of food and baked goods. 

Potato Croquettes

Potato Croq1

There are three things that I love most in the world. My husband. My kids. And mashed potatoes. I mean honestly, what is better than creamy, buttery, homemade mashed potatoes smothered in steaming hot gravy? Almost nothing UNLESS of course you turn those scrumptious mashed potatoes in a crispy potato croquette.

Because I adore mashed potatoes so much I usually end up making way too much when I cook them so I inevitably will have leftovers. Most times I have too many leftovers to eat before it’s time to toss them so I like to put those potatoes to good use before that happens, That is where potato croquettes come in. They are really simple to make as most of the work is already done for you. The first time that I made them I used straight mashed potatoes and nothing else. They were absolutely divine but I wanted to up the ante so the next time I made them I added diced ham (or prosciutto) in the croquettes along with small chunks of mozzarella cheese. Absolute heaven! I usually double this recipe because I would rather have “too many” potato croquettes than not enough. You can always freeze what is left and then bake them off the next time a craving hits. Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of cooled mashed potatoes
  • 2 tbs finely minced onion
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 tbs grated Parmesan cheese
  • Kosher salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1/3 cup Panko breadcrumbs
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • Oil for frying

Instructions

Combine the cooled mashed potatoes, onion, garlic, Parmesan cheese, salt, and pepper in a large bowl and mix until well combined.

Set up 3 bowls, one for the egg, one for the breadcrumbs, and one for the flour.

Form the potato mixture into 2-3″ logs. Dip them first in flour, then egg, and then breadcrumbs.

Attach a deep fry thermometer to the side of a large pot. Add the oil and heat until it reaches 350ºF. Maintain the temperature between 350-375ºF while frying.

Add the potato croquettes to the hot oil, 3-4 at a time. Cook for about 2 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove them with a slotted spoon and place on a cooling rack or paper towel lined plate. Cool slightly and serve.

Potato Croq2

Autumn Spice Oatmeal Cookies

Pumpkin Spice Cookies

Squeal!!! Sally McKenny has a brand new cookbook, Sally’s Cookie Addiction: Irresistible Cookies, Cookie Bars, Shortbread, and More, and to my delight, there was an outstanding recipe for Autumn Spice Oatmeal Cookies. (page 42) There isn’t one word in that title that doesn’t make me happy. Let me repeat: AUTUMN SPICE OATMEAL COOKIES!! What’s better than fall spices, oatmeal, and cookies??!! I’ll tell you, not much!

Due to my high blood sugars, I’ve been hesitant to bake much lately but I really couldn’t resist these cookies so I decided to go ahead and make them. I thought it was good opportunity to try and turn them into a treat that was a touch healthier and lower in sugar so that I could enjoy them too. I followed the recipe as written making only a few substitutions with regards to the ingredients. First, I substituted the granulated sugar with Truvia Baking Blend Natural Sweetener in order to cut down on the calories. Be aware that Truvia® does NOT measure one-to-one with granulated sugar so it’s imperative that you adhere to the conversion chart that is printed on the side of the bag.

I also cut down the molasses from 1 tbs to only 1/2 tbs, I felt that using a little less would still impart the molasses flavor while lessening the overall calorie and sugar count. Instead of sweetened coconut I used unsweetened as it allowed the texture of the cookie to remain the same without adding the extra sugar. In place of ordinary dried cranberries I used  Ocean Spray Reduced Sugar Craisins Dried Cranberries  which again saved on calories and sugar. Lastly, I eliminated the pepitas that were called for (simply because I do not like them) and instead, I added half of a finely diced Granny Smith apple to the cookie dough. I adore apples and I thought it would be a perfect addition to these fall inspired cookies.

The cookies were fabulous and were everything you want a fall cookie to taste like. They were chewy, delicious, and bursting with flavor. The best part was that the substitutions I made resulted in an excellent cookie and I certainly did not miss anything by reducing the sugars where I was able to. Of course, these still need to be enjoyed in moderation but it’s nice to know that when a sweet craving hits, I have something on hand that I can eat with minimal guilt.

**I listed to ORIGINAL recipe below noting my substitutions in the parenthesis.**

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar (OR 1/8 cup Truvia Baking Blend)
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 tbs unsulphured or dark molases (OR 1/2 tbs)
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 3 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 cup dark or semisweet chocolate chips
  • 3/4 cup shredded sweetened coconut (OR shredded unsweetened coconut)
  • 3/4 cup dried cranberries (OR Craisins Reduced Sugar Dried Cranberries)
  • 1/2 cup pepitas
  • 1/2 Granny Smith apple, finely diced (optional)

Instructions

Whisk the flour, baking soda, pumpkin pie spice, cinnamon, and salt together in a medium bowl. Set aside.

In a large bowl, using a handheld mixer or a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium-high speed until smooth, about 1 minute. Add the brown sugar and granulated sugar and beat on medium-high until creamed, about 2 minutes. Add in the eggs, molasses, and vanilla. Beat on high speed until combined, scrape down the sides as needed.

Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix on low speed until combined. With the mixer on low, beat in the oats. Once combined, fold in the chocolate chips, coconut, cranberries, and pepitas or apples if using them. The dough will be thick and sticky. Cover and chill the dough in the fridge for at least 45 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Line baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. Set aside.

Scoop balls of dough, about 2 tbs each, onto the baking sheets, spacing them about 2″ apart. Bake for 12-14 minutes or until lightly browned on the sides. The centers will still look a little soft.

Remove from the oven and allow the cookies to cool on the baking sheets for 5 minutes before transferring to wire racks to cool completely.

**Tip – The cookies will stay fresh for up to a week when stored in an airtight container**

 

 

“How-To” Cooking – Studding

Studding means to decorate and/or flavor food by inserting seasonings into the surface of the food. Common ingredients used in studding are garlic, spices (such as cloves), or nuts. Whole hams are commonly studded with cloves, pork roasts are commonly studded with slivers of garlic and/or apple slices, and even breads can be studded with raisins or other dried fruits. Studding enhances the presentation of food and imparts another layer of flavor as well.